Comanche National Grassland

Purgatoire River in Picket Wire Canyon in Comanche National Grassland
April 3, 2013

Comanche National Grassland in eastern Colorado features dinosaur tracks, petroglyphs, springs, Indian ruins and a section of the Santa Fe Trail in a stretch of prairie and canyon lands.

Read More >>

The Ludlow Massacre

Ludlow tent camp burned to the ground
February 14, 2013

Staff writer In 1910, the Colorado coal mining industry employed 10 percent of the state’s workers, almost 16,000 people. Colorado Fuel and Iron dominated the industry. John D. Rockefeller bought the company in 1902 and turned it over to his son, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. nine years later. Attempts had been made to unionize Colorado coal miners since 1883. The United Mine Workers of America began a concentrated effort to…

Read More >>

Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site

Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Colorado
July 6, 2012

Staff writer The Native Americans in the camp next to Big Sand Creek slept without fear the cold morning of Nov. 29, 1864. Their Cheyenne and Arapaho chiefs had ceded most of their land and had been assured they would be safe at the encampment. Most of the men from the encampment had gone out hunting buffalo. An American flag fluttered from a chief’s tipi in pledge of this group’s…

Read More >>

Rocky Ford

Watermelon Day celebration in Rocky Ford Colorado
July 6, 2012

Staff writer The literal-minded explorer Kit Carson crossed the Arkansas River at a shallow spot filled with shale and boulders and he dubbed it Rocky Ford Crossing Place. The name stuck when two men traveling west with a wagon train decided to stop at the site and build a general store. The small community begun by G.W. Swink and Asa Russell in 1871 was actually about two miles from the…

Read More >>

Rocky Ford Museum

Rocky Ford Museum Colorado
July 6, 2012

Staff writer The Rocky Ford Museum is a testament to community, displaying items donated and dug up (literally) by residents, and showing off the collection since 1941 in a series of locations donated, spruced up and maintained by members of the community. In 1940, Rocky Ford volunteers formed an Explorers League to encourage members to keep their eyes open for bits of the history and culture of the town and…

Read More >>

Koshare Indian Kiva and Museum

Koshare eagle dancer from La Junta Colorado
July 6, 2012

Boy Scout Troop 232 of La Junta meets in a unique setting: a kiva and museum that the Scouts themselves built with the support of community groups. Visitors today can stop to enjoy the art reflecting Native American culture, the amazing roof of the 62-year-old kiva and the performances of the Koshare Indian Dancers that are an elite arm of the troop. Troop 232 was formed in 1933 by J.F….

Read More >>

Boggsville National Historic District

Boggsville National Historic District Colorado
July 5, 2012

Staff writer For 10 years in the 1800s, the idyllic town of Boggsville flourished as a haven on the Santa Fe Trail. The only non-military settlement on the trail, Boggsville served as a welcome stopping place for travelers heading west and a center for trade and agriculture and today reminds motorized visitors of the life that used to be. Boggsville grew where the Arkansas and Purgatory rivers join two miles…

Read More >>

Eastern Plains

Truck loaded with hay on Colorado's Eastern Plains
July 5, 2012

Staff writer Colorado’s Eastern Plains are part of the wide open expanse that is the Great Plains – shared with Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming, as well as the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. It’s an area that covers 500,000 square miles. In Colorado, the changes are striking between the sparsely developed plains, the mountainous west and the population centers…

Read More >>

Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site

Bent's Old Fort in Colorado
July 5, 2012

By Linda Cornett Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site brings to life the wilderness of 150 years ago, with faithfully reconstructed buildings and costumed re-enactors in character as traders, travelers, Native Americans and craftsmen. The original adobe fort was built in 1833, the only permanent white settlement on the Santa Fe Trail. Brothers William and Charles Bent and Ceran St. Vrain built the fort with the intention to trade with…

Read More >>

Santa Fe Trail

Santa Fe Trail at Bent's Fort
July 5, 2012

By Linda Cornett For 60 formative years the Santa Fe Trail, from Missouri into Mexico, was a vital route for commerce, emigration and military transport. Billed as America’s first international highway, the trail now consists of sometimes visible wagon ruts in the prairie with historic sites scattered along its 900 miles. The trail was born in the adventurous mind of frontiersman William Becknell. Becknell, living in Missouri and deeply in…

Read More >>